Top Menu

Gingerbread Cake

Soft, tender cake, with that wonderful gingerbread spice aroma. Ahhhh...delicious! Top it with our Sugar Free Cashew Cream Frosting, and for a not-so sugar free topping on top of that...Pralines!

GingerbreadCake1

The 4 main types of molasses are that are produced during the boiling/refining process; fancy, cooking, blackstrap, and light. Each with their own slightly different taste:

Fancy Molasses
This is the highest grade of molasses and is the pure juice of the sugar cane, which has been condensed, inverted and purified (and is also the sweetest). This molasses can be used 'raw' on poured on pancakes or spread on toast, to all your baked goods recipes.

Blackstrap Molasses
This is the final by-product of refining molasses. It has been highly-concentrated into a thick, dark mass with a slightly bitter taste, due to the majority of the sugar crystals being removed. Its bold flavor are great in recipes liked baked beans, or even gingerbread if you want a less sweet product.

Cooking Molasses
A blend of fancy molasses and blackstrap . It has the best of both worlds, with a thick, dark consistency, but less sweet straight fancy molasses. The addition of the blackstrap gives it a fuller-flavored taste. Use cooking molasses in all your cooking or baking needs.

Light Molasses
This a product made from fancy molasses with the addition of glucose-fructose and other ingredients. It is specially-formulated to be a calorie-reduced option.


Get your wet and dry ingredients blended together separately, then combine everything along with the melted (but cooled) butter.GingerbreadCake2

This is what will happen if you add melted butter that is too warm, into the mixture that is much cooler. Little tiny bits of hardened butter form.

Don't worry though, beat it thoroughly with your mixer and it will be just fine. The pieces are small enough that it will melt when baked, and won't make any difference at all to the final texture of the cake.GingerbreadCake3

Pour the batter into a greased pan. I find if you are using a silicon pan, you don't need to add a layer of parchment paper at the bottom since you can bend the pan as you're releasing the cake.

But if you are using a metal pan, I would add a square of parchment onto the bottom, in addition to greasing it. Better to be too cautious, then to end up with a cake that rips as you're trying to release it!GingerbreadCake4

Gingerbread Cake
Print
Author:
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 12
Tender, moist, and filled with those wonderful aromatic gingerbread spices - I know you're gonna love it!
Ingredients
  • ½ cup butter or margarine, melted and cooled
  • ½ cup buttermilk or milk alternative
  • 2 eggs
  • ½ cup cooking molasses
  • ½ cup sugar
  • 2 tsp vanilla
  • 2 cups GFC Cake & Pastry Flour Blend or GFC Cup4Cup Style Flour Blend
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • ¼ tsp baking soda
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • 1 tsp ground ginger
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • ½ tsp ground cardamom
  • ¼ tsp allspice
  • ¼ tsp nutmeg
Instructions
  1. Melt butter, and set aside to cool.
  2. In a medium bowl whisk together the buttermilk, eggs, molasses, sugar, vanilla, and ginger. Whisk in the cooled butter, mix well to combine.
  3. In large mixing bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, ginger, cinnamon, cardamom, nutmeg, and allspice. Pour the wet ingredients into the dry mixture and whisk until just combined and there are no longer any dry streaks of flour.
  4. Pour the batter into an 8" greased and parchment lined pan and bake at 350°F for 45-55 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in the center of the cake comes out clean.
  5. Remove from oven and cool for 10 minutes before turning out onto a rack and cooling completely.
Notes
*if butter solidifies when added to mixture don't worry, it will be blended into small enough pieces that when it bakes it will be fine.

 

8 Responses to Gingerbread Cake

  1. Margarette December 17, 2014 at 5:34 am #

    In the picture you show a topping what is the recipe for that?

    Thank you.

    Margarette

  2. Lou Ann December 17, 2014 at 5:58 am #

    Oops. In the instructions it says add pepper...did you mean that, it is not listed in the ingredient section. Must be a blip!

    • Marla Hingley
      Marla Hingley December 17, 2014 at 8:52 am #

      Thanks for the catch! I actually made this recipe twice, once with pepper and without - just to see if that little bit of extra spice complimented the other spices. For me, it had a bit too much of a bite for me, so I omitted it (but forgot in my directions - so thanks again!).

  3. Cathy December 17, 2014 at 6:10 am #

    Looking forward to making this gingerbread for Christmas; however, the whipped cream topping looks so lovely and delicious in the picture. Is it a maple or pecan blend? Can you share that recipe with us too?

  4. Mae December 4, 2016 at 10:03 am #

    Can i use black strap molasses n RH gf flour blend

    • Marla Hingley
      Marla Hingley December 4, 2016 at 1:42 pm #

      While you can substitute fancy or cooking molasses out for blackstrap, it will impart a more bitter flavor and will be noticeably less sweet (as blackstap has had the least amount of sugar). But if that's what you like, great!

      Using different gluten free flour blends can produce varied results, due to the nature of each individual gluten free flours unique properties and the ratios a particular brand chose for their blend. I have not tried this recipe with anything other then then blend I listed, so I can't 100% for certain say that this cake will taste as awesome if using a different blend.

Leave a Reply

Comments

comments