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Quinoa White Bread/Buns

This bread has a nice neutral taste, with a light spongy texture. This dough is firm enough to handle and shape into buns or even baguette loaves.

QuinoaBurgerBun1

My bread maker is quite a few years old and does not have a gluten free selection. Although that doesn’t mean you still can’t use it to do all the work. Choose the ‘dough’ cycle as it should only have 1 rise – don’t use the ‘pizza dough’ setting, as that usually has 2 rises-which is what you do not want.

Once all the ingredients have been added, and the machine is mixing everything together, be sure to scrape the sides down to ensure everything gets mixed in evenly. Once it’s mixed and the rise cycle begins, give the top surface of the dough a quick spray with cooking oil. This will prevent the top from drying out, and creating a thin crust (like in the picture) – which will prevent it from fully rising.

For instructions on how to mix the dough by hand, see The Secret to Baking Gluten Free Bread.

Once the rise cycle is over, scoop out some dough with wet hands and shape into balls, smoothing the tops with  your fingers. The hamburger pan shown in the picture below  is the best for making gluten free buns – there is just enough of a lip to hold the dough as it rises/spreads, ending up with the perfect sized buns. To ensure the buns are the same size (and therefor cook at the same time), use a kitchen scale to divide up the dough evenly into 12.

QuinoaBurgerBuns6

For a golden brown crust, brush the tops with a bit a cream (adding a pinch of salt will also help!). Bake until golden brown and internal temperature reads over 202°F with an instant read thermometer.

 

 

Quinoa White Bread/Buns
5.0 from 1 reviews
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Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 12
Using a bread maker to mix and rise the dough is a huge time saver! Once the machine has done all the hard work, shape the bread/loaves as desired.
Ingredients
  • 1⅛ cups warm water (110°F)
  • 3 Tbsp oil
  • 3 eggs
  • 1⅛ cups quinoa flour
  • 1 cup cornstarch
  • 1 cup tapicoca starch
  • 3 Tbsp brown sugar
  • 3 tsp xanthan gum
  • 1 ½ tsp salt
  • 2 ¼ tsp (1 pkg) instant yeast
Instructions
  1. Add all liquids into bread makers pan first.
  2. Combine all dry ingredients, except yeast, in a bowl and whisk well to ensure xanthan gum is thoroughly blended in.
  3. Add flour mixture to pan, then sprinkle over the yeast.
  4. Select the dough setting and press start (generally around 90 minutes). Use a rubber spatula to scrape down the sides during mixing. Once the mixing cycle is over, lightly spray top of dough with cooking oil to prevent top from drying out during the rising cycle.
  5. Once the dough has completed its rising cycle - To make regular bread loaves, spoon dough into a greased loaf pan. Smooth top surface with wetted hands. For making a baguette loaf or buns, turn dough out onto a greased piece of parchment paper. With very wet hands shape the dough how ever you like. Be sure to smooth tops with wet hands, since the dough will rise but will not 'stretch' out and smooth the top of the dough on its own.
  6. If desired, brush cream (with a pinch of salt) on dough's surface for a golden crust.
  7. Bake at 350°F for 30-50 minutes (depending on what your baking), or until internal temperature reads over 202°F on an instant read thermometer.
Notes
For instructions on how to mix the dough by hand, see The Secret to Baking Gluten Free Bread.

 

25 Responses to Quinoa White Bread/Buns

  1. Pat Johnson August 6, 2015 at 5:22 am #

    Just double checking…..in the beginning you say after the rising cycle you make into buns, yet in your instructions you say after mixing – make into buns.
    an you clarify that for me please. Thanks.

    • Marla Hingley
      Marla Hingley August 6, 2015 at 9:13 am #

      Sorry for the confusion! Once the mixing & rising cycle is complete, then remove dough and place into a loaf pan, or shape into buns or baguettes and bake.

  2. Sandra L. Swartrz August 6, 2015 at 5:37 am #

    Carb count?
    Calories?

    • Angie Halten (Admin)
      Angie Halten (Admin) August 6, 2015 at 10:02 am #

      172 cal, 27.9g carb/bun

  3. Mae Lanktree August 6, 2015 at 6:15 am #

    I am going to make this bread Sounds very easy Thanks

  4. Ana Gabriela Andrade Andrade August 6, 2015 at 9:51 am #

    Dear Angie

    This recipe sounds just great, THANKS. You have given very good options since I started following the GFC, it feels So Good! Thanks to the whole team you have helped me not only with the recipes but with publications as well, go on guys.
    Ana , Gatineau QC.

    • Angie Halten (Admin)
      Angie Halten (Admin) August 6, 2015 at 10:12 am #

      That’s so great to hear, thanks for letting us know! Switching to a gluten free lifestyle can definitely feel overwhelming at first, but once you know how to shop for the right foods and find some great tasting recipes (that don’t taste gluten free!), life is sweet again!

  5. Douglas August 6, 2015 at 11:38 am #

    Can I substitute for the corn starch? If so what kind is best?

    • Marla Hingley
      Marla Hingley August 6, 2015 at 8:25 pm #

      There is a Flour & Starch Substitution chart in this article: Secret to Baking Gluten Free Bread that lists all the different types of starches that can be used (pretty much) interchangeably (just don’t combine arrowroot starch with dairy products). I would use a blend of potato starch and arrowroot starch in place of the cornstarch.

  6. Carol August 6, 2015 at 3:51 pm #

    Can there be a substitution for the corn starch – like potato starch? I know I can substitute guar gum for xanthan gum. My son is corn intolerant and also xanthan gum whether because its corn based or another reason.
    Thanks

    • Marla Hingley
      Marla Hingley August 6, 2015 at 8:25 pm #

      I would use a a blend of potato starch and arrowroot starch in place of the cornstarch.

  7. Dorothy French August 6, 2015 at 9:57 pm #

    Can you make this without a bread machine? I don’t have one but I do have a KitchenAid mixer

  8. Rae August 7, 2015 at 4:02 pm #

    I made this today. It turned out good. I added more flour as the batter seemed to runny.
    What could have caused it to be runny? I don’t have a bread machine. The loaf fell a bit.

  9. Rani August 8, 2015 at 9:16 pm #

    I’m unable to have corn. What alternatives can I use for the cornstarch?

    • Marla Hingley
      Marla Hingley August 9, 2015 at 4:43 pm #

      There is a Flour & Starch Substitution chart in this article: Secret to Baking Gluten Free Bread that lists all the different types of starches that can be used (pretty much) interchangeably (just don’t combine arrowroot starch with dairy products). I would use a blend of potato starch and arrowroot starch in place of the cornstarch.

  10. Antonia August 18, 2015 at 5:00 pm #

    I baked the Bread, and it is delicious. I had to use flex seed for eggs, and for xsathan gum too.
    But still this is my best bread until now. Thank You Angie very much,
    Antonia.

    • Marla Hingley
      Marla Hingley August 19, 2015 at 6:59 pm #

      Awesome! So glad you like it, thanks for letting us know!

  11. Nancy March 6, 2016 at 1:21 pm #

    For hamburger buns you say to divide the dough evenly into 12 but the picture shows 6. Does this make 6 or 12 buns? Can’t wait to try it, thanks!

    • Marla Hingley
      Marla Hingley March 6, 2016 at 7:12 pm #

      It just depends on how big you want your buns 🙂

  12. Cherie July 15, 2017 at 11:23 am #

    I need more fiber in my bread. Normally I add about two heaping tablespoons of ground flax or maybe in this case, some ground flax and flax seeds to make it more interesting. how much extra water would I need to add ?

    • Marla Hingley
      Marla Hingley July 15, 2017 at 11:30 am #

      In adding that much ground flax, I might try soaking it first in water (like when preparing ‘chia eggs’). Once the ground flax is fully hydrated, I would add it in with the rest of the wet ingredients – mixing it well to make sure it is well combined and evenly distributed. Let me know how it turns out! Have a great day 🙂

  13. Stephen Street February 19, 2018 at 2:48 pm #

    where do i buy hamburger pan. thanks

    • Marla Hingley
      Marla Hingley February 20, 2018 at 2:23 pm #

      You can find hamburger bun pans at specialty kitchen stores, or on amazon.com
      While it may seem like yet another useless kitchen gadget, gluten free breads need all the help they can get to maintain their shape as they bake and I find this pan works great for me.

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