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Lemon Meringue Pie

There are two problems that can occur when making this type of pie, weeping and soggy bottoms.

Weeping occurs when those little yellow drops form on the surface of the meringue and/or a layer of moisture develops between the filling and topping. This is caused from a few things - When the sugar in the meringue  has not completely dissolved, and the meringue has too much moisture.

Using superfine sugar is your best bet for ensuring all the sugar gets fully dissolved (you don’t have to buy superfine sugar, just run it through your food processor until finely ground). To prevent excess moisture in the meringue, adding adding a bit cream of tartar and beating until it holds stiff peaks will remove excess moisture and add extra stability which can help prevent the weeping.

Also, any air pockets that are left between the filling and the meringue can promote weeping, so be sure to spread the meringue evenly over the hot filling. Have the meringue ready as the filling is cooking - the hotter the filling is when you spread the meringue over it, the less chance weeping will occur. As the heat from the filling with help 'cook' the meringue and dry it out.

Soggy bottom crust – pouring hot filling onto a hot crust can create steam between the two, causing the excess moisture to be absorbed into the crust.  Allowing the crust to cool completely after pre-baking will prevent this. Another option is to sprinkle some finely ground cookies onto the crust (sugar or gingersnap cookies would be great). This will absorb any excess moisture keeping the crust crisp, in addition to adding a bit of flavor.

LemonMeringuePie1

For filling, using a heavy-duty non-reactive saucepan (or the acid from the lemon juice will react with the metal and turn the filling grey), whisk together the sugar, cornstarch and salt. Whisk in ¼ cup cold water (warm water will cause clumps) until smooth, then whisk in the remaining cold water.

Over medium-low to medium heat cook mixture, stirring continuously with a spatula once mixture comes to a boil, about 5 minutes. Once it is thick and gel-like, whisk vigorously to smooth out, then cook another minute using a spatula to pull mixture from sides and bottom to prevent scorching. Remove from heat.

In a medium bowl whisk egg yolks until smooth. Slowly ladle in ½ of the hot gel mixture, whisking continuously until incorporated. Repeat with another ½ cup to fully temper the eggs (heating them slowly so they don’t curdle).

Pour the egg mixture into the saucepan, whisking to combine. Return pot to heat and bring back to a boil, about 5 minutes until thick, using a spatula to keep the mixture moving to prevent scorching (you'll know it's thick enough when a spatula is pulled across the bottom of the pan,  and the filling separates like in the middle picture below). Remove from heat and dot with butter, pushing butter under the surface. Let stand for a minute for the butter to melt.

Gently stir and add in the lemon juice and zest, and pour over the cooled crust.

When whipping the meringue, be sure to stop as soon as firm - stiff peaks form (when the beater is turned upside down, the peaks hold without collapsing). If you over-beat it, the egg whites will break and the mixture will become grainy in texture,  dull in color, and won't be able to hold their peaks anymore like in the picture below (although it will taste just fine).

overwhippedmeringue

Lemon Meringue Pie
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Serves: 8
Tips - use brown eggs for a brighter-yellow looking pie. cut pie using a knife dipped in hot water.
Ingredients
    Filling
    • 1 cup sugar
    • ¼ cup + 2 Tbsp cornstarch
    • ¼ tsp salt
    • 2 ½ cups cold water, divided
    • 5 egg yolks*
    • 2 Tbsp butter, softened & cubed
    • 1 ½ Tbsp lemon zest
    • ⅓ cup fresh lemon juice
    Swiss Meringue*
    • 5 egg whites
    • ⅓- 3/4 cup sugar, to taste
    • ½ tsp cream of tartar
    Instructions
    1. Prepare pastry and press into a greased 9” pie plate. Chill for 30 minutes, lightly prick to prevent air bubbles from forming then bake as directed until edges are lightly browned. Allow to cool completely.
    2. For filling, using a heavy-duty non-reactive saucepan, whisk together the sugar, cornstarch and salt. Whisk in ¼ cup cold water until smooth, then whisk in the remaining cold water. Over medium-low heat cook mixture, stirring continuously with a spatula once mixture comes to a boil, about 5 minutes. Once it is thick and gel-like, whisk vigorously to smooth out, then cook another minute using a spatula to pull mixture from sides and bottom to prevent scorching. Remove from heat.
    3. In a medium bowl whisk egg yolks until smooth. Slowly ladle in ½ of the hot gel mixture, whisking continuously until incorporated. Repeat with another ½ cup to fully temper the eggs. Pour the egg mixture into the saucepan, whisking to combine. Return pot to heat and bring back to a boil, about 5 minutes, using a spatula to keep the mixture moving to prevent scorching. Once thick, remove from heat and dot with butter, pushing butter under the surface. Allow to stand for a minute for the butter to melt, then gently stir and add in the lemon juice and zest.
    4. If desired, sprinkle cooled crust with ¼- ½ cup of crushed gingersnap cookies (for added flavor and to keep the crust crisp), then pour over filling.
    5. For the Swiss meringue - Prepare a double boiler with simmering water, making sure that the bowl does not touch the water beneath. In a large bowl whisk egg whites until frothy. Whisk in the sugar 2 Tbsp at a time until you reach your desired sweetness. Place bowl over double boiler and stir gently but constantly – you don’t want to add air to the eggs at this point, just to keep them moving so they don’t cook. Heat until temperature reads between 115-120°F on an instant read thermometer, and sugar is completely dissolved (you can tell by placing a bit of the mixture between your fingers and rubbing them together to feel for any grittiness). Remove from heat and whisk in the cream of tartar. Using a hand mixer, beat until stiff peaks form, about 3 minutes. Take care not to over-beat, or the mixture can ‘break’ and become grainy.
    6. Spoon meringue onto crust, spreading out to ensure there is no air pockets between the filling and the meringue, and that the meringue sticks to the crusts' edge (to prevent it from shrinking).
    7. Bake at 425°F for 5-7 minutes or until tips of meringue become lightly golden. Let sit and room temperature for at least 1 hour before serving.
    Notes
    *For the meringue, the Swiss (cooked) style will produce the best meringue with a light but dense texture, however if you want to save time you can omit the cooking step and just whip the ingredients together until stiff peaks form then spread over the hot filling.

     

    4 Responses to Lemon Meringue Pie

    1. Joyce June 28, 2016 at 9:39 am #

      I love lemon meringue and will be so happy to add it back into my recipe collection. I appreciate all the extra tips you include with your recipes, such as how to avoid a soggy pie crust. This is key to being a better baker. Thank you for all your hard work - I really appreciate all the recipes and tips! You're the best!!!

      • Marla Hingley
        Marla Hingley June 28, 2016 at 5:41 pm #

        Thanks so much! Hope you enjoy the pie 🙂 Have a great day!

    2. Lorene August 4, 2016 at 9:00 am #

      I'm so looking forward to trying this recipe as I haven't been able to eat lemon meringue pie for years. I'm allergic to corn though and plan to substitute tapioca starch for the corn starch. Do you have any experience with this substitution and if it will work?
      Thanks, Lorene

      • Marla Hingley
        Marla Hingley August 4, 2016 at 10:19 am #

        Arrowroot starch is best in combination with acidic ingredients, so that would be my first choice, although tapioca starch can be used as well. I have not tried either myself, so please let me know what you used and how it turned out. Thanks!

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