Top Menu

Crusty Baguette

Thick crunchy outside, and soft on the inside. Having the bread bake with some steam is how you get this result.

Baguette1

Stir until dough is thick and smooth.

Baguette2

Cover bowl with plastic wrap, and place in a warm place to rise for 2 hours (I wrap the bowl in a thick towel and place in an  unheated oven).

Baguette3

To prepare baguette pans,  cut parchment to fit in the depressions, spray with some cooking oil and sprinkle on a bit of GF cornmeal if you have it. Then using a large spoon (or your hands), scoop out some dough and gently fill up pans. Wet hands and smooth out the tops of the loaves. Sprinkle on any seeds you’d like at this point, then cover the loaves with a piece of plastic wrap sprayed with a bit of cooking oil. Let rise for 30 minutes.

Baguette4

This oven set up is crucial to creating a crusty outer crust, with soft insides: Place a baking stone on the center rack, and a broiler pan (or large rectangular pan) on the lowest rack, and preheat oven to 450°F for 30 minutes. Remove plastic wrap from dough and place baguette pan inside the oven on the baking stone, and add 1 cup of water to the broiler pan. Bake for 30 minutes, or until internal temperature of loaf reaches between 200°F-208°F.

Baguette6

Crusty Baguette
5.0 from 1 reviews
Print
Author:
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 12
Thick crunchy outside, and soft on the inside. Having the bread bake with some steam is how you get this result.
Ingredients
  • 1⅓ cups warm water (110°F)
  • 1 Tbsp sugar or honey
  • 1 Tbsp yeast
  • 1 cups brown rice flour
  • ¾ cup sorghum flour
  • 1½ cups tapioca starch
  • ½ Tbsp salt
  • 1 Tbsp xanthan gum
  • 2 eggs
  • 2½ Tbsp oil
Instructions
  1. To proof the yeast; in a small dish, stir sugar and warm water until mostly dissolved. Gently stir in yeast and let sit 10 minutes to activate.
  2. In a large bowl combine dry ingredients and whisk together well.
  3. In a small dish whisk together the eggs and oil. Stir in the yeast mixture.
  4. Pour half of the liquid mixture into the dry ingredients, and stir until combined. Add the remaining liquid, stirring until dough is thick and smooth.
  5. Cover bowl with plastic wrap, and place in a warm place to rise for 2 hours (I wrap the bowl in a thick towel and place in the unheated oven).
  6. Prepare baguette pans: cut parchment to fit in the depressions, spray with some cooking oil and sprinkle on a bit of gluten free cornmeal if you have it. Then using a large spoon (or your hands), scoop out some dough and gently fill up pans (you don’t want to compress any of the air bubbles that have been created in the dough). Wet your hands and smooth out the tops of the loaves. Sprinkle on any seeds you’d like at this point, then cover the loaves with a piece of plastic wrap sprayed with a bit of cooking oil. Let rise for 30 minutes.
  7. Prepare the oven: place a baking stone on the center rack, and a broiler pan (or large rectangular pan) on the lowest rack. Preheat oven to 450°F for 30 minutes.
  8. Remove plastic wrap, place baguette pan inside the oven on the baking stone, and add 1 cup of water to the broiler pan. Bake for 30 minutes, or until internal temperature of loaf reaches between 200°F-208°F, using an instant read thermometer (using a thermometer is the only way to be sure you loaf is fully cooked).
  9. Remove baguette pan from oven, peel off parchment from the loaves, put back into baguette pan and continue baking for an additional 5 minutes (to crisp bottom of loaves).
  10. Allow to cool on a baking rack before slicing.

11 Responses to Crusty Baguette

  1. Antonia August 7, 2014 at 7:09 pm #

    Angie, I can not have eggs, what can I put in insted?
    Thank You. I really like to try making the baquett.

    Antonia.

    • Marla Hingley
      Marla Hingley August 8, 2014 at 8:38 pm #

      You can try replacing the eggs with flaxseed: 1 tablespoon flaxseed meal + 3 tablespoons warm water. In a sauce pan, simmer flaxseed meal and water for about 5 minutes or until a thick, egg-like consistency has been reached. Let cool completely before adding to recipe. Makes 1/4 cup egg substitute = 1 egg

  2. Georgina December 7, 2014 at 8:48 pm #

    Do not have xanthan gum ,only have grund flax seed . Can I use it in place of the gum . I like to try it thank you Georgina.

  3. Kathy March 18, 2015 at 9:03 am #

    I have made this recipe twice now but i doubled it to make one large round loaf.. IT came out delicious just like Italian bread, but i prefer not to eat rice products I was wondering how it would come out if i substituted the rice flour for amaranth.. I use that quite often for other things like pie crust. excellent! but anyway what do you think about mixing it in with the tapioca and sorghum flour? Looks like i will be experimenting a bit.

    • Angie Halten (Admin)
      Angie Halten (Admin) March 18, 2015 at 9:45 am #

      Thanks for letting us know! I'm so glad you liked it. Using too much amaranth can lead to a dense loaf, so you should only substitute in up to 25% of total flour used in order to end up with similar results. Other flours you could use as well to round out the blend in place of the rice flour is more sorghum, teff or millet flour. So yes, after a bit of trial and error :), please let us know what you ended up using and how it turned out!

      • Kathy March 18, 2015 at 2:02 pm #

        I actually prefer it a little more dense. but i will definitely let you know how it turns out...

        • Kathy March 18, 2015 at 8:02 pm #

          I just finished making a loaf tonight with the amaranth in place of the rice flour and it came out great! I would send you a photo but there is no place to post one

  4. Angie Halten (Admin)
    Angie Halten (Admin) May 19, 2015 at 7:07 am #

    From Kathy D (via email): I replaced half of the rice with half Amaranth.. I would have replaced all of it but i didn't have enough amaranth left.. I like it very much but as you know the amaranth has a little stronger flavor. I actually did not use as much water mixture when i doubled everything else. it came out too wet the first time, so i cut the water mixture back some. As you know it is trial and error , never sure on the exact amounts I kind of just eyeball it to get the right consistency..

  5. Carol August 7, 2015 at 7:48 am #

    Could you make this with an all purpose gluten free flour, in a bread machine?

    • Marla Hingley
      Marla Hingley August 7, 2015 at 3:51 pm #

      Yes, just be aware that changing the flour blend will affect the taste and texture of the bread. Gluten free bread recipes are such finicky things! You can use a bread machine but I wouldn't let it bake in there, or you won't get the same type of thick crusty crust typical of traditional french bread. Select the 'dough' cycle - just make sure that there is only 1 rise. Once it has been mixed and risen, remove and shape into loaves and bake as directed in the recipe.

Leave a Reply

Comments

comments