Top Menu

Spice/Coffee Grinder

spicegrinderWhole spices that are ground just before using are far more fragrant and flavorful than those you buy pre-ground. The reason is because of their volatile aromatic compounds.

Once whole spices have been ground, the majority of those potent flavor molecules begin to evaporate.

Depending on how long your ground spices have been sitting in your cupboard (and how they have been stored), they can be a quarter of the strength than those that are freshly ground.

Don't shake your spices and herbs directly over a hot pot, the moisture will go into the bottle and over time spoil them

Whole or ground spices (and herbs) will begin to break down when they are exposed to moisture and heat - from the stove, direct sunlight, or the moisture that can build up if they are stored in the fridge or freezer.

The ideal storage temperature is around 70° F, in a location away from heat, moisture and direct sunlight.

A spice grinder is an inexpensive little machine that makes easy work of grinding spices.  Because spices and coffee beans have such a pronounced flavor profile, and their oils can linger in the grinder, it is best to have 2 grinders - one for coffee and one for spices.

Make your own Garam Masala spice blend:

2 Tbsp cumin seeds

2 Tbsp coriander seeds

1 Tbsp cardamom seeds

1 Tbsp black peppercorns

2 whole cloves

1/2 cinnamon stick, broken into small pieces (in a mortar)

Heat all ingredients in a dry skillet for 2-3 minutes until spices are fragrant and turn a shade darker. Transfer to a bowl and allow to cool completely. Once cool, grind to a fine powder and store for up to 2 months.

How to clean the grinder after each use:  grind 2 Tbsp of raw/dried white rice, discard, and repeat until grinder is odor free. Carefully sweep out the grinder with a small brush.

What to look for when buying

  • holds about 1/2 cup
  • variable grinding settings (usually in relation to grinding coffee beans): peculator (medium),  drip (fine), espresso (extra fine)
  • time/size - depending on how much you fill the grinder, this determines the time the grinder is run for to achieve the appropriate grind size
  • fine brush to clean the grinder/blades after each use
  • easy to clean
  • integrated cord storage is useful

GFC Tried & Tested Recommendation

 

All the products that we have recommended have been tried and tested in our Gluten Free Club Test Kitchen, and have been chosen as our top picks based on their:

  • Efficiency
  • Quality of the task they are designed to do
  • Quality of manufacturing/Longevity
  • Usefulness
  • Best value for your money

If you decide to purchase any of the items we recommend, Amazon will send a small percentage of the purchase price to the Gluten Free Club (at no extra cost to you!). We appreciate and value your support, thank you!


To see all our favorite kitchen items that we use and recommend in; Bakeware & Cookware, Small Appliances, Kitchen Tools & Gadgets, Knives, and Recommended Cookbooks, check out our shopping page at Amazon.com eStore - Gluten Free Club


4 Responses to Spice/Coffee Grinder

  1. Mj December 5, 2016 at 12:29 pm #

    I just finished making the Gingerbread Muffins. They smell heavenly but too hot to taste. I am interested in a good jellypan pan. I eat only in healthy cookwear which does not include the coated ones or aluminum. So what is out there for me. I wonder if I use parchment paper that would make it safe? I also would love the grinder but it doesn't say if it is glass. I've searched for a glass grinder. Sometimes the glass is cheap which means it contains lead. Since you aren't cooking in it, maybe not a problem. Hard to find answers. I only cook in SaladMaster pans and they don't carry the jellyroll pan. Any help from anyone?

    • Marla Hingley
      Marla Hingley December 6, 2016 at 8:47 am #

      The grinder above has a plastic dome. If plastics do contain any of the chemicals you're trying to avoid, they are released only when the plastic gets heated. In the case of a spice grinder you shouldn't have to worry.

      For bakeware, alternatives to metal would be those made from glass, ceramic, stoneware, stainless steel, or cast iron. Although the only sheet pan I've seen made from one of those alternatives I've listed would be stoneware. I loved mine...until it cracked in the oven. At $50+ they are a very expensive option, especially when then are relatively fragile. Yes parchment is an easy answer to cover your aluminum sheet pans with, I use it all the time. Hope that helps!

  2. Mj December 5, 2016 at 12:30 pm #

    Above comment concerns jellyroll pan also. I'd be interested in a healthy pan.

    • Marla Hingley
      Marla Hingley December 6, 2016 at 8:48 am #

      For bakeware, alternatives to metal would be those made from glass, ceramic, stoneware, stainless steel, or cast iron. Although the only sheet pan I’ve seen made from one of those alternatives I’ve listed would be stoneware. I loved mine…until it cracked in the oven. At $50+ they are a very expensive option, especially when then are relatively fragile. Yes parchment is an easy answer to cover your aluminum sheet pans with, I use it all the time. Hope that helps!

Leave a Reply

Comments

comments